Anitra's DanceAnitra's Dance
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Anitra's Dance (Grieg)

from Peer Gynt Suite No. 1
arranged for percussion ensemble by Brian Blume
Level: Med-Advanced
Duration: 3:15
Personnel: 12-13 players
State Lists: Florida | Texas | Indiana
Release Date: 2013
Delivery Method: Physical
Product ID : TSPCE-77
Price: $40.00
Item #: TSPCE-77

Formats Available:


All percussion sounds used in this recording were generated from Virtual Drumline software also by Tapspace.


Description

Composed by Edvard Grieg, Anitra’s Dance is preceded by In the Hall of the Mountain King in the famous Peer Gynt Suite. Originally scored for strings and triangle, and with a great deal of pizzicato playing in the strings, it allowed for a fairly seamlessly transfer to the idiom of percussion ensemble. The timbral palette is expanded by the addition of several nonpitched percussion instruments, and some of the melodic material has been enhanced by arpeggiated harmonies and rapid scalar passages, particularly in the marimba voice. The result is a lovely classical adaptation by Brian Blume that can serve as a quiet programming contrast.

Anitra's Dance comes as a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing individual parts and a recording.

Instrumentation

  • Glockenspiel
  • Xylophone
  • Chimes
  • 2 vibraphones
  • 3 marimbas—(2) low A, (1) low C
  • 4 timpani
  • Double bass*
  • Bass drum
  • Cymbals (3 suspended cymbals, ride cymbal)
  • Accessories (finger cymbals, triangle, windchimes)


*Optional

Shared Recordings

Reviews

Although many students may not be familiar with the title, most will be familiar with the famous tune in “Anitra’s Dance” of Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt Suite No. 1. Originally set as a spritely mazurka for string orchestra with triangle, Brian Blume has adapted the work for a large ensemble of keyboard percussion, timpani, accessories, and optional double bass.

This arrangement could appeal to programs with a wide variety of student ability levels. The scoring requires fairly confident four-mallet ability in the vibraphone and two of the three marimba parts. This applies especially to the execution of fast sixteenth-note passages (quarter note equaling 160–180) while holding four mallets. The xylophone, glockenspiel, and chimes parts are a bit more accessible to less experienced players. This is also true of the timpani and three percussion parts, all of which utilize quarter note and slower note values (with the occasional eighth note) to pro-vide the style and character of the music. The timpani part is playable by a beginner. Although the tuning changes are not indicated in the score, all are reasonable and could be worked out with a little direction from the teacher or director. The two percussion parts are also playable by beginners or perhaps non-percussionists.

The scoring offers some creative new material as well as effects that give a well-informed nod to the original—making this far more than a note-for-note transcription. The arranger inserts quick sixteenth-note runs to help enhance the direction of specific phrases, consistent with a drum corps “pit” approach to arranging, and uses dead strokes to emulate the pizzicato effect employed by Grieg. The use of chimes without pedal is especially effective and charming to this end.

While the instrument requirements may cause ensemble directors of smaller programs to not consider this piece, a careful examination of the score reveals that the piece could be performed with fewer instruments. This is evident in octave and unison doublings that could be performed by one player. This would take some creativity and careful consideration of balance, but is certainly within the realm of possibility.

–Jason Baker
Percussive Notes
Vol. 54, No. 2 – May 2016

Description

Composed by Edvard Grieg, Anitra’s Dance is preceded by In the Hall of the Mountain King in the famous Peer Gynt Suite. Originally scored for strings and triangle, and with a great deal of pizzicato playing in the strings, it allowed for a fairly seamlessly transfer to the idiom of percussion ensemble. The timbral palette is expanded by the addition of several nonpitched percussion instruments, and some of the melodic material has been enhanced by arpeggiated harmonies and rapid scalar passages, particularly in the marimba voice. The result is a lovely classical adaptation by Brian Blume that can serve as a quiet programming contrast.

Anitra's Dance comes as a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing individual parts and a recording.

Instrumentation

  • Glockenspiel
  • Xylophone
  • Chimes
  • 2 vibraphones
  • 3 marimbas—(2) low A, (1) low C
  • 4 timpani
  • Double bass*
  • Bass drum
  • Cymbals (3 suspended cymbals, ride cymbal)
  • Accessories (finger cymbals, triangle, windchimes)


*Optional

Shared Recordings

Reviews

Although many students may not be familiar with the title, most will be familiar with the famous tune in “Anitra’s Dance” of Edvard Grieg’s Peer Gynt Suite No. 1. Originally set as a spritely mazurka for string orchestra with triangle, Brian Blume has adapted the work for a large ensemble of keyboard percussion, timpani, accessories, and optional double bass.

This arrangement could appeal to programs with a wide variety of student ability levels. The scoring requires fairly confident four-mallet ability in the vibraphone and two of the three marimba parts. This applies especially to the execution of fast sixteenth-note passages (quarter note equaling 160–180) while holding four mallets. The xylophone, glockenspiel, and chimes parts are a bit more accessible to less experienced players. This is also true of the timpani and three percussion parts, all of which utilize quarter note and slower note values (with the occasional eighth note) to pro-vide the style and character of the music. The timpani part is playable by a beginner. Although the tuning changes are not indicated in the score, all are reasonable and could be worked out with a little direction from the teacher or director. The two percussion parts are also playable by beginners or perhaps non-percussionists.

The scoring offers some creative new material as well as effects that give a well-informed nod to the original—making this far more than a note-for-note transcription. The arranger inserts quick sixteenth-note runs to help enhance the direction of specific phrases, consistent with a drum corps “pit” approach to arranging, and uses dead strokes to emulate the pizzicato effect employed by Grieg. The use of chimes without pedal is especially effective and charming to this end.

While the instrument requirements may cause ensemble directors of smaller programs to not consider this piece, a careful examination of the score reveals that the piece could be performed with fewer instruments. This is evident in octave and unison doublings that could be performed by one player. This would take some creativity and careful consideration of balance, but is certainly within the realm of possibility.

–Jason Baker
Percussive Notes
Vol. 54, No. 2 – May 2016



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