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Floor Play

quartet for body percussion
Level: Med-Easy
Duration: 3:00
Personnel: 4 players
Release Date: 2019
Product ID : TSPCE19-031
Price: $30.00
Item #: TSPCE19-031

Formats Available:


Description

No equipment? No problem! Alex Stopa’s Floor Play uses no traditional instrumentation and requires only “body percussion” like foot stomps, thigh slaps, hand claps, finger snaps, etc. With a fun, interactive presentation, this groovy quartet would be a great interlude to any concert and requires no setup logistics. The rhythms are repetitive, thematic, and relatively simple, making this a great choice for younger players.

This piece comes as a professionally printed and bound score and includes individual parts in PDF format for printing or for tablet viewing.

Instrumentation

Floor Play requires 4 players with no traditional instrumentation. Only “body percussion” is employed (stomps, slaps, claps, finger snaps, etc.)

Reviews

“Floor Play” is a quartet for body percussion comprised entirely of stomps, claps, finger snaps, and drumming on your legs and face. The aesthetic throughout is groovy, fun, and exciting. To paraphrase the performance notes in the score, “Floor Play” is an opportunity to perform a percussion quartet without any instrument setup required.

The rhythms are repetitive and often presented in at least two parts at the same time. There are accent patterns on sixteenth notes, a few examples of split rhythm across parts, and a small of amount “drum set like” coordination required when stomping, drumming on your legs, and clapping all within one measure. Some level of theatrics is inherent in this type of piece, which could be a great opportunity for young players to understand that you can “come out of your shell” on stage and have fun performing and interacting with your friends and the audience.

This piece is sure to be a crowd pleaser. It would work well for a beginning percussion ensemble (capable of playing accent patterns on sixteenth notes) to a university ensemble and everything in between. Without needing any instruments, it would be great for a small performance space or on a program with a full stage of gear for other pieces. It is the perfect type of work to open a concert, grab the audience’s attention, and put a smile on their faces.

—Justin Bunting
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 58, No. 2, April 2020

Description

No equipment? No problem! Alex Stopa’s Floor Play uses no traditional instrumentation and requires only “body percussion” like foot stomps, thigh slaps, hand claps, finger snaps, etc. With a fun, interactive presentation, this groovy quartet would be a great interlude to any concert and requires no setup logistics. The rhythms are repetitive, thematic, and relatively simple, making this a great choice for younger players.

This piece comes as a professionally printed and bound score and includes individual parts in PDF format for printing or for tablet viewing.

Instrumentation

Floor Play requires 4 players with no traditional instrumentation. Only “body percussion” is employed (stomps, slaps, claps, finger snaps, etc.)

Reviews

“Floor Play” is a quartet for body percussion comprised entirely of stomps, claps, finger snaps, and drumming on your legs and face. The aesthetic throughout is groovy, fun, and exciting. To paraphrase the performance notes in the score, “Floor Play” is an opportunity to perform a percussion quartet without any instrument setup required.

The rhythms are repetitive and often presented in at least two parts at the same time. There are accent patterns on sixteenth notes, a few examples of split rhythm across parts, and a small of amount “drum set like” coordination required when stomping, drumming on your legs, and clapping all within one measure. Some level of theatrics is inherent in this type of piece, which could be a great opportunity for young players to understand that you can “come out of your shell” on stage and have fun performing and interacting with your friends and the audience.

This piece is sure to be a crowd pleaser. It would work well for a beginning percussion ensemble (capable of playing accent patterns on sixteenth notes) to a university ensemble and everything in between. Without needing any instruments, it would be great for a small performance space or on a program with a full stage of gear for other pieces. It is the perfect type of work to open a concert, grab the audience’s attention, and put a smile on their faces.

—Justin Bunting
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 58, No. 2, April 2020



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