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Palm Reader (Download)

for percussion duet
Level: Advanced
Duration: 4:00
Personnel: 2 players
Release Date: 2019
Product ID : TSPCD19-005DL
Price: $28.00
Item #: TSPCD19-005DL

Formats Available:


Description

Combining asymmetrical rhythms with an octatonic melody, Benjamin Holmes’ percussion duet Palm Reader is a brilliantly tempestuous piece that features split rhythms and melodies, requiring the performers to know their own part as well as their partner’s.

Each performer has a set of four differently pitched crotales and a snare drum. They also share a djembe, which adds depth to the overall sound of the piece. With all of these instruments combined, the sound of the pieces cover a wide range of tones and timbres, giving it a full sound. This piece would be a great addition to any junior or senior recital, especially for advanced players looking to showcase their ability to split fast, intricate rhythms!

Instrumentation

8 crotales (C, C#, D#, E, F#, G, A, A#)

2 snare drums

Djembe (shared)

Reviews

The art of palmistry, also known as palm reading, is often explained away as a parlor trick without substance. With its “flashy” split parts, I expected this work to embody its namesake; I was wrong. This piece is unique and creative, offering far more than novelty. 

“Palm Reader” is a duo for percussion that, in around four minutes, takes the audience on a journey using over-the-top rhythmic complexity and lilting octatonic melodies. This advanced solo manages to unexpectedly present a gift for the performers and the audience as it is both visually and aurally appealing. Benjamin Holmes harnesses the power of the piece’s asymmetrical rhythms through orchestrating an intricate hocket — between crotales, snare drum, and djembe — that reveals a complex yet aesthetically accessible work, worthy of multiple performances. 

This efficient work calls for each performer to use a snare drum and four unique pitches on crotales while they both share a djembe. With this instrumentation, Holmes has written an advanced work for percussion that is approachable for performers from a variety of backgrounds. While the use of pervasive split parts will appeal to performers with a strong background in marching percussion, this work would be a great addition for any undergraduate recital, or even as a small chamber ensemble piece on a percussion ensemble concert.

—Quintin Mallette
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 1, February 2020

Description

Combining asymmetrical rhythms with an octatonic melody, Benjamin Holmes’ percussion duet Palm Reader is a brilliantly tempestuous piece that features split rhythms and melodies, requiring the performers to know their own part as well as their partner’s.

Each performer has a set of four differently pitched crotales and a snare drum. They also share a djembe, which adds depth to the overall sound of the piece. With all of these instruments combined, the sound of the pieces cover a wide range of tones and timbres, giving it a full sound. This piece would be a great addition to any junior or senior recital, especially for advanced players looking to showcase their ability to split fast, intricate rhythms!

Instrumentation

8 crotales (C, C#, D#, E, F#, G, A, A#)

2 snare drums

Djembe (shared)

Reviews

The art of palmistry, also known as palm reading, is often explained away as a parlor trick without substance. With its “flashy” split parts, I expected this work to embody its namesake; I was wrong. This piece is unique and creative, offering far more than novelty. 

“Palm Reader” is a duo for percussion that, in around four minutes, takes the audience on a journey using over-the-top rhythmic complexity and lilting octatonic melodies. This advanced solo manages to unexpectedly present a gift for the performers and the audience as it is both visually and aurally appealing. Benjamin Holmes harnesses the power of the piece’s asymmetrical rhythms through orchestrating an intricate hocket — between crotales, snare drum, and djembe — that reveals a complex yet aesthetically accessible work, worthy of multiple performances. 

This efficient work calls for each performer to use a snare drum and four unique pitches on crotales while they both share a djembe. With this instrumentation, Holmes has written an advanced work for percussion that is approachable for performers from a variety of backgrounds. While the use of pervasive split parts will appeal to performers with a strong background in marching percussion, this work would be a great addition for any undergraduate recital, or even as a small chamber ensemble piece on a percussion ensemble concert.

—Quintin Mallette
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 1, February 2020


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