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Le Marche Diabolique (Download)

for percussion trio
Level: Med-Advanced
Duration: 2:25
Personnel: 3 players
Release Date: 2019
Product ID : TSPCE19-010DL
Price: $29.00
Item #: TSPCE19-010DL

Formats Available:


Description

Michael LaMattina’s Le Marche Diabolique takes its name from the obsessive and insistent nature of the music. The hocket-like interplay between all three parts, sudden changes in dynamics, displacement of the regular beat, and the incessantly fiendish xylophone melody all add to the diabolic nature of this music.

The snare drum part features a mix of orchestral and rudimental styles, incorporating closed and open rolls, fast Swiss army triplets, flam taps, and pataflaflas, all at a wide range of dynamics. The two percussion parts that support the snare drum consist of standard orchestral instruments like crash cymbals, triangles, and bass drum. 

Instrumentation

Xylophone

Drums (snare drum, tom, concert bass drum)

Cymbals & gongs (suspended cymbal, crash cymbals, tam-tam)

Accessories (2 woodblocks, 2 triangles, duck call)

Reviews

Reflecting the diabolic nature of the music through sudden dynamic changes, beat displace- ment, and fluctuating interplay between parts, “Le Marche Diabolique” is a 21⁄2-minute percussion trio featuring a soloistic snare drum part. 

The demand is exceedingly different between the snare drum part versus the ensemble parts. The snare drum soloist will need to handle some brisk passages of traditional rudiments such as paradiddles, flam taps, and Swiss army triplets. Outside of a single-measure phrase on xylophone (which repeats a number of times), and one slightly challenging triplet-based hock- et passage, the ensemble parts could easily be handled by a high school performer or even an advanced middle schooler. The most demanding element of the work is the dynamic range. The ensemble coordination should be relatively easy to put together outside of a single measure where the players play individual partials of eighth-note triplets to create a single triplet line between them.

Given the short duration, challenge of the snare drum part, and relative ease of the ensemble parts, this piece would work well for a solo and ensemble piece for high school players, or possibly as a short snare drum piece on an undergraduate recital.

—Brian Nozny
Percussive Notes
Vol. 57, No. 4, September 2019

Description

Michael LaMattina’s Le Marche Diabolique takes its name from the obsessive and insistent nature of the music. The hocket-like interplay between all three parts, sudden changes in dynamics, displacement of the regular beat, and the incessantly fiendish xylophone melody all add to the diabolic nature of this music.

The snare drum part features a mix of orchestral and rudimental styles, incorporating closed and open rolls, fast Swiss army triplets, flam taps, and pataflaflas, all at a wide range of dynamics. The two percussion parts that support the snare drum consist of standard orchestral instruments like crash cymbals, triangles, and bass drum. 

Instrumentation

Xylophone

Drums (snare drum, tom, concert bass drum)

Cymbals & gongs (suspended cymbal, crash cymbals, tam-tam)

Accessories (2 woodblocks, 2 triangles, duck call)

Reviews

Reflecting the diabolic nature of the music through sudden dynamic changes, beat displace- ment, and fluctuating interplay between parts, “Le Marche Diabolique” is a 21⁄2-minute percussion trio featuring a soloistic snare drum part. 

The demand is exceedingly different between the snare drum part versus the ensemble parts. The snare drum soloist will need to handle some brisk passages of traditional rudiments such as paradiddles, flam taps, and Swiss army triplets. Outside of a single-measure phrase on xylophone (which repeats a number of times), and one slightly challenging triplet-based hock- et passage, the ensemble parts could easily be handled by a high school performer or even an advanced middle schooler. The most demanding element of the work is the dynamic range. The ensemble coordination should be relatively easy to put together outside of a single measure where the players play individual partials of eighth-note triplets to create a single triplet line between them.

Given the short duration, challenge of the snare drum part, and relative ease of the ensemble parts, this piece would work well for a solo and ensemble piece for high school players, or possibly as a short snare drum piece on an undergraduate recital.

—Brian Nozny
Percussive Notes
Vol. 57, No. 4, September 2019


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