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Now the Day Is Over (Download)

for percussion ensemble
Level: Med-Easy
Duration: 4:40
Personnel: 9 players
State Lists: Florida | Texas
Release Date: 2011
Product ID : TSPCE-56DL
Price: $42.00
Item #: TSPCE-56DL

Formats Available:


Description

Now the Day Is Over represents the John Willmarth's lullaby to his son. Based on a 19th-century English hymn and reminiscent of Renaissance-era melodies, the piece has a simple yet deceptively sophisticated atmosphere of peace and tranquility.

Scored for 9 players (including piano or synth).



Use of this product is governed by the license terms outlined here.

Instrumentation

  • Crotales (mallets and triangle beaters)
  • Glockenspiel
  • Chimes
  • 2 vibraphones (mallets, bows, and triangle beaters) 
  • 2 marimbas—low A
  • 32" timpano
  • Concert bass drum
  • Cymbals (2 suspended cymbals, sizzle cymbal)
  • Accessories (2 triangles, tam tam, mark tree)
  • Piano

Reviews

Originating from a melody hummed as he rocked his son to sleep, John Willmarth evolved that simple idea into a piece for a large ensemble.  Requiring nine players, the work opens with a drone created through a sustained timpani note, glissandi on the vibraphones, and the novel technique of swirling a roof brush (i.e., scrub brush) on the head of a bass drum.  On top of the established texture, the marimbists present a four-mallet chorale using the interval of a fifth with one appearance of a fourth.  A rhythmic quality is then achieved through overlapping short ostinatos.  First appearing in the piano, the melody is later doubled with the vibraphone and marimba.  After a brief piano interlude, a new rhythmic idea serves the same purpose as the earlier section.  As voices enter, the tension builds into a full ensemble statement of the theme, which eventually dissipates as the piece concludes.

This piece would be a good introduction into the percussion orchestra concept for high school ensembles.  With different parts ranging from easy to moderate difficulty, there is a part suitable for the varying abilities of any ensemble.  Whether it is balancing the levels between accompaniment and melody, lining up different rhythmic patterns across the ensemble, or experimenting with mallet choices, there is a lot of material for educators to help develop young percussionists.

–Darin Olsen
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 50, No. 4, July 2012

Description

Now the Day Is Over represents the John Willmarth's lullaby to his son. Based on a 19th-century English hymn and reminiscent of Renaissance-era melodies, the piece has a simple yet deceptively sophisticated atmosphere of peace and tranquility.

Scored for 9 players (including piano or synth).



Use of this product is governed by the license terms outlined here.

Instrumentation

  • Crotales (mallets and triangle beaters)
  • Glockenspiel
  • Chimes
  • 2 vibraphones (mallets, bows, and triangle beaters) 
  • 2 marimbas—low A
  • 32" timpano
  • Concert bass drum
  • Cymbals (2 suspended cymbals, sizzle cymbal)
  • Accessories (2 triangles, tam tam, mark tree)
  • Piano

Reviews

Originating from a melody hummed as he rocked his son to sleep, John Willmarth evolved that simple idea into a piece for a large ensemble.  Requiring nine players, the work opens with a drone created through a sustained timpani note, glissandi on the vibraphones, and the novel technique of swirling a roof brush (i.e., scrub brush) on the head of a bass drum.  On top of the established texture, the marimbists present a four-mallet chorale using the interval of a fifth with one appearance of a fourth.  A rhythmic quality is then achieved through overlapping short ostinatos.  First appearing in the piano, the melody is later doubled with the vibraphone and marimba.  After a brief piano interlude, a new rhythmic idea serves the same purpose as the earlier section.  As voices enter, the tension builds into a full ensemble statement of the theme, which eventually dissipates as the piece concludes.

This piece would be a good introduction into the percussion orchestra concept for high school ensembles.  With different parts ranging from easy to moderate difficulty, there is a part suitable for the varying abilities of any ensemble.  Whether it is balancing the levels between accompaniment and melody, lining up different rhythmic patterns across the ensemble, or experimenting with mallet choices, there is a lot of material for educators to help develop young percussionists.

–Darin Olsen
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 50, No. 4, July 2012


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