Deus Ex Metronome (Download)Deus Ex Metronome (Download)
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Deus Ex Metronome (Download)

for solo snare drum and audio
Level: Advanced
Duration: 7:20
Release Date: 2019
Product ID : TSPCS19-012DL
Price: $22.00
Item #: TSPCS19-012DL

Formats Available:


Description

Russell Wharton was inspired to compose Deus Ex Metronome by a device ubiquitous and invaluable to the journey of many musicians – the BOSS DB-90 Dr. Beat Metronome. This solo incorporates an audio accompaniment created solely from samples recorded (and liberally manipulated) from the DB-90. 

This intricate accompaniment lays the groundwork for a complex array of rhythms and textures from the soloist. Musical influences are derived from pianist and composer Tigran Hamasyan, jazz drummer Mark Guiliana, and the indelible rapper Kendrick Lamar. In this melting pot of artistry and technique, Wharton has created a composition that is truly singular and unique.

Instrumentation

Concert snare drum (sticks/brushes)

Amplification system (for included audio accompaniment)

Reviews

“Deus Ex Metronome” is a snare drum solo with audio accompaniment. As one may infer from the title, the audio track is the metronome. However, this is not just any metronome; Russell Wharton sampled the sounds from the Boss DB-90 and used them as both a click track and melodic source (by manipulating the DB-90’s tuning pitches). 

The audio track starts with three measures of solo metronome in 4/4 at 90 bpm. The snares are to be turned off, and the performer should have brushes at the ready. The snare enters on measure four, playing a theme comprised of quintuplet partials. This rhythmic phrasing is explored throughout the piece. The intensity is heightened by increasing the rate of subdivisions to sextuplets, phrased across the beat and over the bar. The time signature then weaves be- tween 7/8, 3/4, 4/4, 3/8, 5/16, 1/4, and 6/4, before settling into 12/8. The quintuplet theme now returns, this time with a stick in the right hand. The left hand plays rhythmic brush sweeps be- fore switching to a stick, when both hands play sixteenth-note based rhythms. The phrases again stretch over the barline. The rhythmic intensity increases, aided by the electronic melodies. 

The next section is a bit faster, incorporating groove-based solo ideas over a syncopated sixteenth-note track. The tempo then increases, and the drum set enters on the track. The snares are turned on at this point. After the drum set drops out, the melody and snare become one, with the snare soon embellishing upon the rhythmic framework. The tempo decreases for the final section, where quintuplets reappear, phrased in both the melody and solo parts. The piece builds to a fortississimo climax with sixteenth-note triplets as the ending rhythm. 

The piece has a very futuristic feel, at times reminiscent of video-game music. The performer must be comfortable playing to both a click and melodic track. Since the solo is performed with accompaniment, there is little room for error. It will take some time and practice to prepare this piece; however, it will be time well spent.

—Jeff W. Johnson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 1, February 2020

Description

Russell Wharton was inspired to compose Deus Ex Metronome by a device ubiquitous and invaluable to the journey of many musicians – the BOSS DB-90 Dr. Beat Metronome. This solo incorporates an audio accompaniment created solely from samples recorded (and liberally manipulated) from the DB-90. 

This intricate accompaniment lays the groundwork for a complex array of rhythms and textures from the soloist. Musical influences are derived from pianist and composer Tigran Hamasyan, jazz drummer Mark Guiliana, and the indelible rapper Kendrick Lamar. In this melting pot of artistry and technique, Wharton has created a composition that is truly singular and unique.

Instrumentation

Concert snare drum (sticks/brushes)

Amplification system (for included audio accompaniment)

Reviews

“Deus Ex Metronome” is a snare drum solo with audio accompaniment. As one may infer from the title, the audio track is the metronome. However, this is not just any metronome; Russell Wharton sampled the sounds from the Boss DB-90 and used them as both a click track and melodic source (by manipulating the DB-90’s tuning pitches). 

The audio track starts with three measures of solo metronome in 4/4 at 90 bpm. The snares are to be turned off, and the performer should have brushes at the ready. The snare enters on measure four, playing a theme comprised of quintuplet partials. This rhythmic phrasing is explored throughout the piece. The intensity is heightened by increasing the rate of subdivisions to sextuplets, phrased across the beat and over the bar. The time signature then weaves be- tween 7/8, 3/4, 4/4, 3/8, 5/16, 1/4, and 6/4, before settling into 12/8. The quintuplet theme now returns, this time with a stick in the right hand. The left hand plays rhythmic brush sweeps be- fore switching to a stick, when both hands play sixteenth-note based rhythms. The phrases again stretch over the barline. The rhythmic intensity increases, aided by the electronic melodies. 

The next section is a bit faster, incorporating groove-based solo ideas over a syncopated sixteenth-note track. The tempo then increases, and the drum set enters on the track. The snares are turned on at this point. After the drum set drops out, the melody and snare become one, with the snare soon embellishing upon the rhythmic framework. The tempo decreases for the final section, where quintuplets reappear, phrased in both the melody and solo parts. The piece builds to a fortississimo climax with sixteenth-note triplets as the ending rhythm. 

The piece has a very futuristic feel, at times reminiscent of video-game music. The performer must be comfortable playing to both a click and melodic track. Since the solo is performed with accompaniment, there is little room for error. It will take some time and practice to prepare this piece; however, it will be time well spent.

—Jeff W. Johnson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 1, February 2020


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