Stompin' in SevenStompin' in Seven
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Stompin' in Seven

for the solo drummer
Level: Advanced
Duration: 4:30
State Lists: Florida | Texas | Indiana
Release Date: 2013
Product ID : TSPCS-55
Price: $16.00
Item #: TSPCS-55

Formats Available:


Description

The idea that would become Stompin’ in Seven has existed in the mind of composer David Reeves since 2002. Rooted in the drumming of Herlin Riley, who grew up in New Orleans and plays with Wynton Marsalis, the idea was to write a through-composed solo percussion piece in an improvisational style using as few instruments as possible. That ultimately came to mean a snare drum, a kick drum with double pedal, and hi-hat cymbals. The snare and kick serve as a dueling duet and the hats as accompaniment, only played with the left foot and never struck by the sticks. Reeves’s description of Riley’s playing also serves as a good descriptor of this terrific solo: “Powerful yet sensitive, gritty and earthy yet eloquent and refined, rooted in place by heavy doses of soulful groove.”

Stompin’ in Seven comes as a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing individual parts and a recording.

 

Instrumentation

  • Snare drum
  • Kick drum (w/double pedal)
  • Hi-hat

Reviews

A unique tribute to New Orleans drummer Herlin Riley, David Reeves’ “Stompin’ in Seven” is a hybrid between a second-line transcription and a rudimental solo. It also offers performers an interesting crossover between a traditional multi-percussion solo and drumset transcription. In the program notes, Reeves explains that he “wanted to write a through-composed solo percussion piece in an improvised style using as few instruments as possible. ” He also explains that the piece is a duet of sorts played between the hands and feet; the snare drum and double bass drum duel back in forth while the hi-hat serves as accompaniment.

The piece begins with a basic New Orleans second-line ostinato in 7/4 and features short, almost rudimental, interjections on the snare drum. The dueling double bass drum component includes grace notes (single, drag, and three-note), metric shifts, and articulation details that all take place underneath the ostinato in the snare drum. In the feet, performers must be comfortable with intricate double bass drum rhythms and splash hi-hat techniques. Advanced drumset skills are recommended, and a strong rudimental snare drum background is essential.

—Thad Anderson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 52, No. 2. March 2014

Description

The idea that would become Stompin’ in Seven has existed in the mind of composer David Reeves since 2002. Rooted in the drumming of Herlin Riley, who grew up in New Orleans and plays with Wynton Marsalis, the idea was to write a through-composed solo percussion piece in an improvisational style using as few instruments as possible. That ultimately came to mean a snare drum, a kick drum with double pedal, and hi-hat cymbals. The snare and kick serve as a dueling duet and the hats as accompaniment, only played with the left foot and never struck by the sticks. Reeves’s description of Riley’s playing also serves as a good descriptor of this terrific solo: “Powerful yet sensitive, gritty and earthy yet eloquent and refined, rooted in place by heavy doses of soulful groove.”

Stompin’ in Seven comes as a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing individual parts and a recording.

 

Instrumentation

  • Snare drum
  • Kick drum (w/double pedal)
  • Hi-hat

Reviews

A unique tribute to New Orleans drummer Herlin Riley, David Reeves’ “Stompin’ in Seven” is a hybrid between a second-line transcription and a rudimental solo. It also offers performers an interesting crossover between a traditional multi-percussion solo and drumset transcription. In the program notes, Reeves explains that he “wanted to write a through-composed solo percussion piece in an improvised style using as few instruments as possible. ” He also explains that the piece is a duet of sorts played between the hands and feet; the snare drum and double bass drum duel back in forth while the hi-hat serves as accompaniment.

The piece begins with a basic New Orleans second-line ostinato in 7/4 and features short, almost rudimental, interjections on the snare drum. The dueling double bass drum component includes grace notes (single, drag, and three-note), metric shifts, and articulation details that all take place underneath the ostinato in the snare drum. In the feet, performers must be comfortable with intricate double bass drum rhythms and splash hi-hat techniques. Advanced drumset skills are recommended, and a strong rudimental snare drum background is essential.

—Thad Anderson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 52, No. 2. March 2014



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