Triptych BoomTriptych Boom
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Triptych Boom

for solo snare drum and percussion trio
Level: Med-Advanced
Duration: 5:05
Personnel: 4
State Lists: Texas
Release Date: 2014
Product ID : TSPCE14-010
Price: $40.00
Item #: TSPCE14-010



Description

Triptych Boom features a snare soloist backed by three multipercussionists. The snare drummer is presented with an ever-changing combination of sticks, brushes, and hands while exploring a number of creative techniques in which the drum is played. The accompaniment parts are equally intriguing, as the percussionists are called on to manage multiple instruments, sticks, mallets, and hand techniques. This accompanying trio creates a uniquely colorful backing for the soloist and composer Chad Floyd crafted several moments where clever interplay occurs between all players. The result is a blend of subtlety, groove, color, and all around originality.

As an added extra, this piece comes with an alternate “solo only” version that includes an electro-acoustic audio backing track. Much of the snare part in this optional, slightly longer (6:05) version is the same; the audio accompaniment, however, varies greatly from the trio version.

Triptych Boom is provided as a full, bound folio and a CD-ROM containing printable parts, a live audio recording, as well as accompanying sheet music and audio files for the optional version with audio accompaniment.



Below is the alternate version for solo with audio accompaniment. Performed by Chad Floyd.

Instrumentation

  • Xylophone
  • Vibraphone
  • Marimba—low A
  • Drums (piccolo snare drum, snare drum, djembe)
  • Cymbals & gongs (wind gong, China cymbal, sizzle cymbal,hi-hat)
  • Accessories (2 pitches of log drums, cabasa, low jam block)

Reviews

This exciting piece features the snare drummer, while also providing an interesting and energetic foundation from the percussion trio. The triptych is comprised of two sections in 4/4 and one section in 3/4. The tempo (ranging from quarter note equaling 110–132) allows the piece to feel either relaxed or intense depending upon the dynamics and note density.

Throughout the piece, the snare drum soloist is to make use of the rim and all areas of the drumhead. Nylon brushes, sticks, and bundled sticks are utilized throughout. The solo part often features the use of muted strokes with one hand as if the performer were playing a conga drum. During these times, the other hand still performs with the implement, producing many interesting tonal possibilities. Rhythmically, implied three-note groupings are a central fixture within the solo.

The marimba player’s duties are split between marimba, wind gong, and djembe. The performer must be comfortable with basic four-mallet technique. The xylophone player uses everything from double strokes on chord tones to bowed vibraphone and China cymbal. At times, this part also includes four-mallet technique on vibraphone. At other times, the performer plays the left hand on the vibraphone and right hand on the xylophone. The percussion player’s part features both pitched and non-pitched percussion. This player must feel comfortable with four-mallet technique, as it is used both on the vibraphone and non-pitched instruments.

The first section has a repetitive and sometimes sparse nature, both relaxing the listeners and drawing their attention to the snare drum part. The second section features a backbeat and underlying implied figures in the trio, allowing the snare to play various rhythms. Some of these are reminiscent of rhythms played earlier in the piece while others resemble timbale patterns. The final section is in 3/4. Instead of having a waltz-style feel, it relies heavily on dotted-quarter-note-based phrases.

The piece runs approximately five minutes. There is a spiral-bound paper score with a data CD that includes individual parts and mp3 recordings. It also includes a “solo only” version with a MIDI-style backing track. Therefore, this piece could be programmed either on an ensemble concert or an individual recital.

—Jeff W. Johnson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 53, No. 2, May 2015

Description

Triptych Boom features a snare soloist backed by three multipercussionists. The snare drummer is presented with an ever-changing combination of sticks, brushes, and hands while exploring a number of creative techniques in which the drum is played. The accompaniment parts are equally intriguing, as the percussionists are called on to manage multiple instruments, sticks, mallets, and hand techniques. This accompanying trio creates a uniquely colorful backing for the soloist and composer Chad Floyd crafted several moments where clever interplay occurs between all players. The result is a blend of subtlety, groove, color, and all around originality.

As an added extra, this piece comes with an alternate “solo only” version that includes an electro-acoustic audio backing track. Much of the snare part in this optional, slightly longer (6:05) version is the same; the audio accompaniment, however, varies greatly from the trio version.

Triptych Boom is provided as a full, bound folio and a CD-ROM containing printable parts, a live audio recording, as well as accompanying sheet music and audio files for the optional version with audio accompaniment.



Below is the alternate version for solo with audio accompaniment. Performed by Chad Floyd.

Instrumentation

  • Xylophone
  • Vibraphone
  • Marimba—low A
  • Drums (piccolo snare drum, snare drum, djembe)
  • Cymbals & gongs (wind gong, China cymbal, sizzle cymbal,hi-hat)
  • Accessories (2 pitches of log drums, cabasa, low jam block)

Reviews

This exciting piece features the snare drummer, while also providing an interesting and energetic foundation from the percussion trio. The triptych is comprised of two sections in 4/4 and one section in 3/4. The tempo (ranging from quarter note equaling 110–132) allows the piece to feel either relaxed or intense depending upon the dynamics and note density.

Throughout the piece, the snare drum soloist is to make use of the rim and all areas of the drumhead. Nylon brushes, sticks, and bundled sticks are utilized throughout. The solo part often features the use of muted strokes with one hand as if the performer were playing a conga drum. During these times, the other hand still performs with the implement, producing many interesting tonal possibilities. Rhythmically, implied three-note groupings are a central fixture within the solo.

The marimba player’s duties are split between marimba, wind gong, and djembe. The performer must be comfortable with basic four-mallet technique. The xylophone player uses everything from double strokes on chord tones to bowed vibraphone and China cymbal. At times, this part also includes four-mallet technique on vibraphone. At other times, the performer plays the left hand on the vibraphone and right hand on the xylophone. The percussion player’s part features both pitched and non-pitched percussion. This player must feel comfortable with four-mallet technique, as it is used both on the vibraphone and non-pitched instruments.

The first section has a repetitive and sometimes sparse nature, both relaxing the listeners and drawing their attention to the snare drum part. The second section features a backbeat and underlying implied figures in the trio, allowing the snare to play various rhythms. Some of these are reminiscent of rhythms played earlier in the piece while others resemble timbale patterns. The final section is in 3/4. Instead of having a waltz-style feel, it relies heavily on dotted-quarter-note-based phrases.

The piece runs approximately five minutes. There is a spiral-bound paper score with a data CD that includes individual parts and mp3 recordings. It also includes a “solo only” version with a MIDI-style backing track. Therefore, this piece could be programmed either on an ensemble concert or an individual recital.

—Jeff W. Johnson
Percussive Notes
Vol. 53, No. 2, May 2015



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