Waiting to ExhaleWaiting to Exhale
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Waiting to Exhale

for 8 hands on 2 marimbas
Level: Med-Advanced
Duration: 5:50
Personnel: 4 players
State Lists: Missouri
Release Date: 2020
Product ID : TSPCE20-004
Price: $36.00
Item #: TSPCE20-004

Formats Available:


Description

Waiting to Exhale by Peter Naughton was originally written in 2017 for a small jazz combo consisting of vibraphone, steel pan, marimba, upright bass, and drumset. In early 2019, Peter decided to re-orchestrate the piece for marimba quartet (two shared marimbas), which allows for tighter rhythmic precision and a homogenous color. With its driving, perpetual 16th-note interlocking rhythms, this piece requires a strong sense of cohesion among the performers. The musical material of the piece creates a strong feeling of energy and excitement through constant motion and is a perfect compliment to any percussion recital or studio concert.

This piece comes as a full, bound score with a color cover and includes an online download code to access individual parts for printing.

Instrumentation

• 2 marimbas – (1) low A, (1) low C

Reviews

This work for four players on two marimbas was originally written for a small jazz combo; however, the composer re-orchestrated it for a marimba quartet and did a fantastic job. The work takes its inspiration from the Dave Matthews Band and the jam-band genre. The title is a reference to the constant driving rhythmic nature of the work. 

The four players each have rhythmic “cells” and motifs that combine to create the overall rhythmic effect of the work. The four players need to be very capable with rhythmic accuracy to give the work its driving feel. The style of the music and the rhythmic intricacies definitely give it the feel of the jam band, but specifically it is reminiscent of the drumming style of Carter Beauford. 

The overall harmonic nature of the work is in functional western jazz harmony, and while excellently written, the rhythms are definitely the overall start of this piece. There are solo sections for each player, and while solos are written out, it would be a fun exercise to perform original solos during those sections. 

Peter Naughton has offered the percussion world a wonderful quartet that any college percussion ensemble should enjoy playing. Performers and audiences alike would have no problem “jamming” together on this piece, making for a great addition to any concert. 

—Josh Armstrong
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 6, December 2020

Description

Waiting to Exhale by Peter Naughton was originally written in 2017 for a small jazz combo consisting of vibraphone, steel pan, marimba, upright bass, and drumset. In early 2019, Peter decided to re-orchestrate the piece for marimba quartet (two shared marimbas), which allows for tighter rhythmic precision and a homogenous color. With its driving, perpetual 16th-note interlocking rhythms, this piece requires a strong sense of cohesion among the performers. The musical material of the piece creates a strong feeling of energy and excitement through constant motion and is a perfect compliment to any percussion recital or studio concert.

This piece comes as a full, bound score with a color cover and includes an online download code to access individual parts for printing.

Instrumentation

• 2 marimbas – (1) low A, (1) low C

Reviews

This work for four players on two marimbas was originally written for a small jazz combo; however, the composer re-orchestrated it for a marimba quartet and did a fantastic job. The work takes its inspiration from the Dave Matthews Band and the jam-band genre. The title is a reference to the constant driving rhythmic nature of the work. 

The four players each have rhythmic “cells” and motifs that combine to create the overall rhythmic effect of the work. The four players need to be very capable with rhythmic accuracy to give the work its driving feel. The style of the music and the rhythmic intricacies definitely give it the feel of the jam band, but specifically it is reminiscent of the drumming style of Carter Beauford. 

The overall harmonic nature of the work is in functional western jazz harmony, and while excellently written, the rhythms are definitely the overall start of this piece. There are solo sections for each player, and while solos are written out, it would be a fun exercise to perform original solos during those sections. 

Peter Naughton has offered the percussion world a wonderful quartet that any college percussion ensemble should enjoy playing. Performers and audiences alike would have no problem “jamming” together on this piece, making for a great addition to any concert. 

—Josh Armstrong
Percussive Notes
Vol. 58, No. 6, December 2020



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