Elements in Time - GROOVYElements in Time - GROOVY
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Elements in Time - GROOVY

groovy snare drum solos in four flavors
Level: Medium to Med-Advanced
State Lists: Missouri
Product ID : TSPCS-67
Price: $24.00
Item #: TSPCS-67



Description

The GROOVY edition of Danny Raymond's Elements in Time series is all about exposing snare drummers to different grooves. From South America to New Orleans, there's a little something for everyone here!

Cambio de Paso (2:40 - Medium)

Loosely translated as a "change of pace," Cambio de Paso is a perfect introduction to many of the ways a snare drum can be used to create Latin-flavored rhythms and textures. Performed in entirety with the snare strainer in the "off" position, the drum plays the dual role of both conga and timbale while rim clicks and muted strokes take the form of cascara and mambo patterns. In addition to being fun to play and very accessible, the piece offers some challenges in the way of fast singles, syncopated flam passages, and a solid command over dynamic expression.


Mammoth (2:25 - Medium)

Mammoth requires two snare drums—one with with the snares "off" and tuned low, and the other with the snares "on" and tuned normally. The interplay between the two drums creates a mesmerizing tribal-esque sound that continues from start to finish with very little pause. One of the challenges of this piece is the relative lack of rests. Constantly moving from drum to drum, the player must continually navigate 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8 time signatures. Creative stickings and cross-overs make for challenging "traffic patterns" that will help train any student not used to moving his or her hands around. The tempo is moderate, so the occasional double-stroke rolls, flam-drags, and inverted flam-taps won't pose an insurmountable challenge.


What's My Line? (2:10 - Med-Advanced)

In What's My Line?, Raymond get his crawfish broil on with a nifty solo based around New Orleans second line drumming concepts. The performer will be called upon to play with a slight swing of the 16th notes while strolling through syncopated accent patterns (with and without flams), creatively placed rim clicks, and jazz ride-based right hand patterns. This solo makes for a great way to apply jazz stylings to standard rudiments; just be careful not to eat too much jambalaya first!


Full Sail (2:30 - Med-Advanced)

"Jazz isn't dead; it just smells funny." Frank Zappa said that, and we're doing our part to keep it alive a while longer. Full Sail is all about the swing…and the brushes! In a time when many younger players aren't learning to play with brushes, Danny's fast-paced brush solo is good medicine indeed. This piece is just challenging enough (due to tempo) to test even experienced players on how well they can manipulate the brushes to produce the right sounds.

Reviews

As the name implies, this “Elements in Time” collection is geared to the groove. As with the other collections, there is much use of visual and musical snare drum effects. A notation key is included.

The collection begins with “Cambio de Paso,” a Latin-style solo played with the snares off. Pseudo conga and timbale rhythms are created by using the rim and cross-stick effects. As the composer points out, “a three-two rhumba clave can also be felt throughout the piece.” “Mammoth,” a solo for two snare drums, follows. The composer states, “A deep shell snare drum with a looser tuned drumhead is recom- mended to provide a lower, deeper pitched sounding drum.” The snares are off on this drum for even more contrast with the other snare drum. The piece is largely sixteenth notes with accents, flowing through mixed meters. Some crossovers and other effects are included in this 21?2-minute solo.

The third solo, “What’s My Line?,” is to be played in a second-line New Orleans style with slightly swung sixteenth notes. This one will really groove, with lots of flams on the drum and between the rim and the drum. It stays in 4/4 the entire time. The final solo, “Full Sail,” came about as a result of improvising in a recording studio while testing a microphone. Per- formed with brushes, it combines sweeps with strokes, flams, and playing on the rim. This would be a great solo for developing basic brush technique. The improvisatory flavor of this solo gives it a free, through- composed quality.

Each of these solos brings something new and creative to the table. Any of them would be an excellent choice for a recital or music festival. The exploitation of all the unconventional sounds that can be produced on the snare drum really opens up the sonic possibilities of the instrument.

—Tom Morgan
Percussive Notes
Vol. 53, No. 1, March 2015

Description

The GROOVY edition of Danny Raymond's Elements in Time series is all about exposing snare drummers to different grooves. From South America to New Orleans, there's a little something for everyone here!

Cambio de Paso (2:40 - Medium)

Loosely translated as a "change of pace," Cambio de Paso is a perfect introduction to many of the ways a snare drum can be used to create Latin-flavored rhythms and textures. Performed in entirety with the snare strainer in the "off" position, the drum plays the dual role of both conga and timbale while rim clicks and muted strokes take the form of cascara and mambo patterns. In addition to being fun to play and very accessible, the piece offers some challenges in the way of fast singles, syncopated flam passages, and a solid command over dynamic expression.


Mammoth (2:25 - Medium)

Mammoth requires two snare drums—one with with the snares "off" and tuned low, and the other with the snares "on" and tuned normally. The interplay between the two drums creates a mesmerizing tribal-esque sound that continues from start to finish with very little pause. One of the challenges of this piece is the relative lack of rests. Constantly moving from drum to drum, the player must continually navigate 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8 time signatures. Creative stickings and cross-overs make for challenging "traffic patterns" that will help train any student not used to moving his or her hands around. The tempo is moderate, so the occasional double-stroke rolls, flam-drags, and inverted flam-taps won't pose an insurmountable challenge.


What's My Line? (2:10 - Med-Advanced)

In What's My Line?, Raymond get his crawfish broil on with a nifty solo based around New Orleans second line drumming concepts. The performer will be called upon to play with a slight swing of the 16th notes while strolling through syncopated accent patterns (with and without flams), creatively placed rim clicks, and jazz ride-based right hand patterns. This solo makes for a great way to apply jazz stylings to standard rudiments; just be careful not to eat too much jambalaya first!


Full Sail (2:30 - Med-Advanced)

"Jazz isn't dead; it just smells funny." Frank Zappa said that, and we're doing our part to keep it alive a while longer. Full Sail is all about the swing…and the brushes! In a time when many younger players aren't learning to play with brushes, Danny's fast-paced brush solo is good medicine indeed. This piece is just challenging enough (due to tempo) to test even experienced players on how well they can manipulate the brushes to produce the right sounds.

Reviews

As the name implies, this “Elements in Time” collection is geared to the groove. As with the other collections, there is much use of visual and musical snare drum effects. A notation key is included.

The collection begins with “Cambio de Paso,” a Latin-style solo played with the snares off. Pseudo conga and timbale rhythms are created by using the rim and cross-stick effects. As the composer points out, “a three-two rhumba clave can also be felt throughout the piece.” “Mammoth,” a solo for two snare drums, follows. The composer states, “A deep shell snare drum with a looser tuned drumhead is recom- mended to provide a lower, deeper pitched sounding drum.” The snares are off on this drum for even more contrast with the other snare drum. The piece is largely sixteenth notes with accents, flowing through mixed meters. Some crossovers and other effects are included in this 21?2-minute solo.

The third solo, “What’s My Line?,” is to be played in a second-line New Orleans style with slightly swung sixteenth notes. This one will really groove, with lots of flams on the drum and between the rim and the drum. It stays in 4/4 the entire time. The final solo, “Full Sail,” came about as a result of improvising in a recording studio while testing a microphone. Per- formed with brushes, it combines sweeps with strokes, flams, and playing on the rim. This would be a great solo for developing basic brush technique. The improvisatory flavor of this solo gives it a free, through- composed quality.

Each of these solos brings something new and creative to the table. Any of them would be an excellent choice for a recital or music festival. The exploitation of all the unconventional sounds that can be produced on the snare drum really opens up the sonic possibilities of the instrument.

—Tom Morgan
Percussive Notes
Vol. 53, No. 1, March 2015



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