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Flesh and Bone (Download)

for percussion ensemble featuring two soloists
Level: Advanced
Duration: 6:30
Personnel: 8
Release Date: 2018
Product ID : TSPCE18-023DL
Price: $41.00
Item #: TSPCE18-023DL

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Description

Rick Dior’s Flesh and Bone takes its name from the two soloists featured in the work. The first soloist plays their instruments using their hands (as in flesh) and the second soloist plays with sticks (as in bones) to produce sound. These two soloists are accompanied by a six piece mallet ensemble including four marimbas, a vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales. In addition to African rhythms used throughout the piece, the musical material of Flesh and Bone uses complex compound time signatures, running melodic lines, and driving unison statements to make one cohesive and lasting musical impression!

Instrumentation

Crotales (high octave)

Glockenspiel

Vibraphone

4 marimbas—(1) 4-octave, (1) low F, (2) low C

Drums (pipe drum or marching snare, kick drum, 2 congas, 1 pedal djembe, 1 mounted djembe)

Cymbals & gongs (suspended cymbal, finger cymbals)

Accessories (pedal cabasa, woodblock, temple blocks, shekere, shaker)

Reviews

The title of this piece comes from the implements utilized by the two soloists. One soloist plays with hands (flesh), while the other soloist plays with sticks (bones). Reminiscent of a WGI-sounding piece combining rudimental drumming with a dash of world music flare, “Flesh and Bone” calls for one of the soloists to have good command of contemporary rudimental techniques while having the coordination to play pedal bass drum “hits” with some of the rhythmic figures (many times syncopated)—and that’s just the first 16 bars!

The second soloist will have to have fairly advanced conga/hand percussion technique: the ability to perform open vs. closed strokes, open hand slaps, heel/toe technique, muted slaps—they are all included. Coupled with that are the pedaled djembe and the pedaled cabasa, which adds a drumset element to the soloist’s arsenal.

The written mallet parts are quite tricky and create layered grooves that, oftentimes, make the pulse of the music feel like it’s floating. Shifting back and forth between simple, compound, and asymmetric meters is relatively common throughout the composition, so identifying those areas and working through them to seamlessly perform the com- position will be an area on which to focus. Four-mallet technique is required of all but the bass marimba player (Mallet 4), though none of the passages for four mallets are very difficult. Counting and rhythmic precision will be of the utmost importance to success- fully perform this piece.

I would recommend this piece for a college/professional ensemble whose members have extensive experience in playing together with a soloist. The grooves are solid through- out, and the melody is catchy enough to listen to, even for the novice listener.

—Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 57, No. 3, July 2019

Description

Rick Dior’s Flesh and Bone takes its name from the two soloists featured in the work. The first soloist plays their instruments using their hands (as in flesh) and the second soloist plays with sticks (as in bones) to produce sound. These two soloists are accompanied by a six piece mallet ensemble including four marimbas, a vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales. In addition to African rhythms used throughout the piece, the musical material of Flesh and Bone uses complex compound time signatures, running melodic lines, and driving unison statements to make one cohesive and lasting musical impression!

Instrumentation

Crotales (high octave)

Glockenspiel

Vibraphone

4 marimbas—(1) 4-octave, (1) low F, (2) low C

Drums (pipe drum or marching snare, kick drum, 2 congas, 1 pedal djembe, 1 mounted djembe)

Cymbals & gongs (suspended cymbal, finger cymbals)

Accessories (pedal cabasa, woodblock, temple blocks, shekere, shaker)

Reviews

The title of this piece comes from the implements utilized by the two soloists. One soloist plays with hands (flesh), while the other soloist plays with sticks (bones). Reminiscent of a WGI-sounding piece combining rudimental drumming with a dash of world music flare, “Flesh and Bone” calls for one of the soloists to have good command of contemporary rudimental techniques while having the coordination to play pedal bass drum “hits” with some of the rhythmic figures (many times syncopated)—and that’s just the first 16 bars!

The second soloist will have to have fairly advanced conga/hand percussion technique: the ability to perform open vs. closed strokes, open hand slaps, heel/toe technique, muted slaps—they are all included. Coupled with that are the pedaled djembe and the pedaled cabasa, which adds a drumset element to the soloist’s arsenal.

The written mallet parts are quite tricky and create layered grooves that, oftentimes, make the pulse of the music feel like it’s floating. Shifting back and forth between simple, compound, and asymmetric meters is relatively common throughout the composition, so identifying those areas and working through them to seamlessly perform the com- position will be an area on which to focus. Four-mallet technique is required of all but the bass marimba player (Mallet 4), though none of the passages for four mallets are very difficult. Counting and rhythmic precision will be of the utmost importance to success- fully perform this piece.

I would recommend this piece for a college/professional ensemble whose members have extensive experience in playing together with a soloist. The grooves are solid through- out, and the melody is catchy enough to listen to, even for the novice listener.

—Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes 
Vol. 57, No. 3, July 2019


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