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Amalgamation (Download)

solo for snare drum with kick drum and hi-hat
Level: Advanced
Duration: 5:00
State Lists: Texas
Release Date: 2016
Product ID : TSPCS16-002DL
Price: $14.00
Item #: TSPCS16-002DL

Formats Available:


Description

Written for snare drum, kick drum, and hi-hat, Amalgamation features stylistic elements of famed French percussionist Jacques Delécluse (known for his intricate ornamentation) and the popular New York percussionist Joseph Tompkins (known for his complex, asymmetric rhythms). Composer, Luis Rivera also incorporates a third style which isn’t used as often within the classical concert hall—American colonial-style rudimental drumming.

The first use of the kick drum pays homage to Tompkins and his snare/kick drum solo March. The addition of the hi-hat (especially when coupled with the kick) evokes the image of a typical march instrumentation— snare, bass, and cymbals—while adding a layer of technical independence for the performer.

Challenging to the performers and appealing to audiences, Amalgamation will be a great repertoire choice for solo recitals, juries, or multipercussion study.


Instrumentation

  • Concert snare drum
  • Kick drum
  • Hi-hat

Reviews

Commissioned by Tommy Dobbs, Director of Percussion at University of Arkansas-Fort Smith, this piece is quite literally, an amalgamation of three of composer Luis Rivera’s biggest influences: the intricate ornamentation of Jacques Delecluse, the asymmetric rhythmic writing of New York-based composer Joe Tompkins, and his own affnity for American Colonial-style rudimental drumming. 

Rivera challenges all comers in this interesting multi-percussion work. The piece opens with the snare drum playing solo in a rudimental style as if to announce the coronation. Eventually, through multiple dynamic and time signature shifts, he employs the bass drum, followed closely by the hi-hat, and then the fun really starts! 

There are a few inconsistencies in the notation, however. There are times when the composer uses a slash mark to “diddle” a particular segment of a rhythm, and then there are times when he writes out the thirty-second notes, and still other times when he writes both notational devices within the same rhythm to visually represent the rhythm. This is, at times, confusing. A possible compromise would have been to use the alternative notational style used in Scottish drumming to assist in understanding the sticking of these rhythms. 

Advanced drumming skills will be required to even attempt many sections of this piece. Polyrhythms and variations thereof permeate the composition. Once the feet become involved, the performer will need coordination between the hands and feet. Fortunately, the feet are playing simple accompaniment patterns throughout the last two thirds of the composition. Unfortunately, the patterns played with the hands, on top of these ostinato, are, at times, incredibly difficult to play by themselves, never mind while also playing with the feet. Nonetheless, Rivera presents a very musical yet technically demanding composition that is a welcome addition to the repertoire. 

The reduced-sized setup of this piece and the duration of the composition (five minutes) lend itself very well to being performed in a host of different venues from solo recitals, to music school sampler concerts, to community concerts either indoors or out. 

—Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes
Vol. 55, No. 2, 2017

Description

Written for snare drum, kick drum, and hi-hat, Amalgamation features stylistic elements of famed French percussionist Jacques Delécluse (known for his intricate ornamentation) and the popular New York percussionist Joseph Tompkins (known for his complex, asymmetric rhythms). Composer, Luis Rivera also incorporates a third style which isn’t used as often within the classical concert hall—American colonial-style rudimental drumming.

The first use of the kick drum pays homage to Tompkins and his snare/kick drum solo March. The addition of the hi-hat (especially when coupled with the kick) evokes the image of a typical march instrumentation— snare, bass, and cymbals—while adding a layer of technical independence for the performer.

Challenging to the performers and appealing to audiences, Amalgamation will be a great repertoire choice for solo recitals, juries, or multipercussion study.


Instrumentation

  • Concert snare drum
  • Kick drum
  • Hi-hat

Reviews

Commissioned by Tommy Dobbs, Director of Percussion at University of Arkansas-Fort Smith, this piece is quite literally, an amalgamation of three of composer Luis Rivera’s biggest influences: the intricate ornamentation of Jacques Delecluse, the asymmetric rhythmic writing of New York-based composer Joe Tompkins, and his own affnity for American Colonial-style rudimental drumming. 

Rivera challenges all comers in this interesting multi-percussion work. The piece opens with the snare drum playing solo in a rudimental style as if to announce the coronation. Eventually, through multiple dynamic and time signature shifts, he employs the bass drum, followed closely by the hi-hat, and then the fun really starts! 

There are a few inconsistencies in the notation, however. There are times when the composer uses a slash mark to “diddle” a particular segment of a rhythm, and then there are times when he writes out the thirty-second notes, and still other times when he writes both notational devices within the same rhythm to visually represent the rhythm. This is, at times, confusing. A possible compromise would have been to use the alternative notational style used in Scottish drumming to assist in understanding the sticking of these rhythms. 

Advanced drumming skills will be required to even attempt many sections of this piece. Polyrhythms and variations thereof permeate the composition. Once the feet become involved, the performer will need coordination between the hands and feet. Fortunately, the feet are playing simple accompaniment patterns throughout the last two thirds of the composition. Unfortunately, the patterns played with the hands, on top of these ostinato, are, at times, incredibly difficult to play by themselves, never mind while also playing with the feet. Nonetheless, Rivera presents a very musical yet technically demanding composition that is a welcome addition to the repertoire. 

The reduced-sized setup of this piece and the duration of the composition (five minutes) lend itself very well to being performed in a host of different venues from solo recitals, to music school sampler concerts, to community concerts either indoors or out. 

—Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes
Vol. 55, No. 2, 2017



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