Bad JujuBad Juju
Click to enlarge

More images

Click to enlarge

Purchase

Bad Juju

for percussion ensemble
Level: Advanced
Duration: 7:30
Personnel: 8 players
State Lists: Texas
Release Date: 2017
Product ID : TSPCE17-010
Price: $40.00
Item #: TSPCE17-010


Description

NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART…

Chad Heiny’s
brilliant piece Bad Juju juxtaposes deep African grooves played on traditional instruments and dissonant harmonic material played on three marimbas to create a feeling of uneasy suspense throughout the work. Although not a story per se, the piece conjures images of voodooism, bewitchment, and impending doom—sure to raise a few hackles from the listener. There is also plenty of technical demand to satisfy the appetites of experienced players. 

Bad Juju was written for, and dedicated to, Omar Carmenates and the Furman University Percussion Ensemble. 

This piece comes with a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing an audio recording and all individual parts available for printing.

Instrumentation

  • 3 marimbas—(1) low A, (2) low C
  • Crotales (high B, D, A, E, and low D)
  • Drums (doumbek, bongos, sm./med. conga, large conga, small djembe, large djembe, 2 Chinese toms1, concert bass drum, log drums (4 pitches)
  • Cymbals & gongs (stacked cymbals2, medium China cymbal, tam tam, sizzle cymbal3)
  • Accessories (wooden flute4, gankogui bell5, dark wooden claves, small shekere, large triangle, bamboo wind chimes, woodblock, small Zil-Bell6, seed pod rattle, 2 sets of small glass wind chimes7, tuned gong or prayer bowl (pitched to D), small caxixi (pair)


1
Or double-headed concert toms

2Or ribbon crasher-like sound

3Or Swish Knocker

4Optional

5Or large agogo bell

6Or LP Ice Bell

7Or pin chimes

Reviews

As I listened to this piece, I heard the familiar sounds that provide the incidental background music of many chase sequences seen in movies today. From the beginning, it appears that the goal of the piece is atmosphere and texture above melody. While there are melodic elements to the piece, no real melody stands out. At approximately 7 1⁄2 minutes in length, “Bad Juju” provides interesting textures and some dramatic musical moments, but leaves the audience wondering “what’s next?” 

Extensive instrumentation with few alternatives is an unfortunate aspect of this work, as some of the smaller percussion programs in the country simply do not have the instrumentation to perform the work. Compositionally, Chad Heiny utilizes metric modulation and changing time signatures to create rhythmic confusion, which will challenge many groups when learning the piece. At times it gets a bit “drum corps”-like with humongous tutti impacts. The top two marimba parts share the same instrument while performing flourishes of thirty-second notes, which allows the third marimba part to provide rhythmic chording and the fourth to fill out the section by adding a bass line. ere are plenty of good things going on in the melody parts. Unfortunately, some of the really hip melodic content gets buried in the tumult of sound that is coming from the “battery.” 


This work will require four strong marimba players, two of whom will play with four mallets. The battery parts have intricate and tricky thirty-second note passages that will require fast hands and decent drumming chops. This piece will work very well for an undergraduate percussion ensemble concert with ample personnel and equipment, and it will show off the ensemble admirably.


Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes
Vol. 56, No. 2, May 2018

Description

NOT FOR THE FAINT OF HEART…

Chad Heiny’s
brilliant piece Bad Juju juxtaposes deep African grooves played on traditional instruments and dissonant harmonic material played on three marimbas to create a feeling of uneasy suspense throughout the work. Although not a story per se, the piece conjures images of voodooism, bewitchment, and impending doom—sure to raise a few hackles from the listener. There is also plenty of technical demand to satisfy the appetites of experienced players. 

Bad Juju was written for, and dedicated to, Omar Carmenates and the Furman University Percussion Ensemble. 

This piece comes with a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing an audio recording and all individual parts available for printing.

Instrumentation

  • 3 marimbas—(1) low A, (2) low C
  • Crotales (high B, D, A, E, and low D)
  • Drums (doumbek, bongos, sm./med. conga, large conga, small djembe, large djembe, 2 Chinese toms1, concert bass drum, log drums (4 pitches)
  • Cymbals & gongs (stacked cymbals2, medium China cymbal, tam tam, sizzle cymbal3)
  • Accessories (wooden flute4, gankogui bell5, dark wooden claves, small shekere, large triangle, bamboo wind chimes, woodblock, small Zil-Bell6, seed pod rattle, 2 sets of small glass wind chimes7, tuned gong or prayer bowl (pitched to D), small caxixi (pair)


1
Or double-headed concert toms

2Or ribbon crasher-like sound

3Or Swish Knocker

4Optional

5Or large agogo bell

6Or LP Ice Bell

7Or pin chimes

Reviews

As I listened to this piece, I heard the familiar sounds that provide the incidental background music of many chase sequences seen in movies today. From the beginning, it appears that the goal of the piece is atmosphere and texture above melody. While there are melodic elements to the piece, no real melody stands out. At approximately 7 1⁄2 minutes in length, “Bad Juju” provides interesting textures and some dramatic musical moments, but leaves the audience wondering “what’s next?” 

Extensive instrumentation with few alternatives is an unfortunate aspect of this work, as some of the smaller percussion programs in the country simply do not have the instrumentation to perform the work. Compositionally, Chad Heiny utilizes metric modulation and changing time signatures to create rhythmic confusion, which will challenge many groups when learning the piece. At times it gets a bit “drum corps”-like with humongous tutti impacts. The top two marimba parts share the same instrument while performing flourishes of thirty-second notes, which allows the third marimba part to provide rhythmic chording and the fourth to fill out the section by adding a bass line. ere are plenty of good things going on in the melody parts. Unfortunately, some of the really hip melodic content gets buried in the tumult of sound that is coming from the “battery.” 


This work will require four strong marimba players, two of whom will play with four mallets. The battery parts have intricate and tricky thirty-second note passages that will require fast hands and decent drumming chops. This piece will work very well for an undergraduate percussion ensemble concert with ample personnel and equipment, and it will show off the ensemble admirably.


Marcus D. Reddick
Percussive Notes
Vol. 56, No. 2, May 2018



You may also like...

Written for 12 players, this arrangement is punctuated and varied and will bring a refreshing addition of classic literature to any percussion ensemble concert.
Duration: 4:30 - 5:30 | Level: Medium
$35.00
An energetic and masterful work by composer and percussionist Brian Blume, Scenes from the Woods is a quartet written for a circle of marimbas.
Duration: 8:15 | Level: Advanced
$40.00
A delightful work for young percussionists depcting a short, fast ride on a small sled.
Duration: 2:00 | Level: Easy
$30.00
Originally composed for a full orchestra, this piece has been sensitively arranged for marimba quartet.
Duration: 4:30 | Level: Medium
$30.00
#TAPSPACE