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Jalopy

for percussion ensemble
Level: Med-Easy
Duration: 3:20
Personnel: 8 players
State Lists: Texas
Release Date: 2017
Product ID : TSPCE17-029
Price: $36.00
Item #: TSPCE17-029



Description

Jalopy is a programmatic piece that uses all sorts of fun and engaging auxiliary percussion instruments to depict a run-down, rusty old automobile. In addition to these auxiliary instruments like a bike horn, flexatone, Acme siren, and police whistle, John Herndon features standard instruments like xylophone, glockenspiel, timpani, and modest set of basic drums. All of these instruments cohere brilliantly in an amusing, ragtimey experience for the performers and audience.

Herndon dedicated this piece to his grandfather Cleo, who "saw treasure where others saw trash and who could breathe new life into broken things."

Jalopy comes with a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing an audio recording and all individual parts available for printing.

Instrumentation

Glockenspiel

Xylophone*

4 timpani

Drums (snare drum, bass drum, 4 toms)

Cymbals (hi-hat, sus cymbal, splash cymbal)

Accessories (triangle, ratchet, police whistle, siren, wind chimes, flex atone, brake drum, cabs, slide whistle, bike horn, temple blocks, 3 cowbells, vibraslap, tambourine)

*Shared

Reviews

Described by the composer as modeled after ragtime and march music, this 3.5-minute piece for a young percussion ensemble quickly settles into a moderate tempo 4/4 groove with a jaunty melody. While two percussionists share the responsibility of executing the melodies and counter melodies on the xylophone and glockenspiel, the rest of the ensemble plays on a wide variety of auxiliary percussion instruments, as well as cymbals, concert toms, timpani, and a concert bass drum.

In addition to being a fun piece to play and program on a concert, it is also a great way to introduce young students to multiple-percussion score reading and basic extended playing techniques and notation. Some of these techniques include open and closed hi-hat, dampening or muting of instruments, striking various playing areas on a single instrument, and utilizing striking implements in a variety of ways. There are no tuning changes for the four timpani, but the part requires staccato and legato strokes, dampening, and playing on the bowls with the back of the mallets.

Printable parts and an audio recording are available on a CD-ROM that accompanies the score.

—Julie Licata
Percussive Notes
Vol. 56, No. 3, July 2018

Description

Jalopy is a programmatic piece that uses all sorts of fun and engaging auxiliary percussion instruments to depict a run-down, rusty old automobile. In addition to these auxiliary instruments like a bike horn, flexatone, Acme siren, and police whistle, John Herndon features standard instruments like xylophone, glockenspiel, timpani, and modest set of basic drums. All of these instruments cohere brilliantly in an amusing, ragtimey experience for the performers and audience.

Herndon dedicated this piece to his grandfather Cleo, who "saw treasure where others saw trash and who could breathe new life into broken things."

Jalopy comes with a full, bound score and includes a CD-ROM containing an audio recording and all individual parts available for printing.

Instrumentation

Glockenspiel

Xylophone*

4 timpani

Drums (snare drum, bass drum, 4 toms)

Cymbals (hi-hat, sus cymbal, splash cymbal)

Accessories (triangle, ratchet, police whistle, siren, wind chimes, flex atone, brake drum, cabs, slide whistle, bike horn, temple blocks, 3 cowbells, vibraslap, tambourine)

*Shared

Reviews

Described by the composer as modeled after ragtime and march music, this 3.5-minute piece for a young percussion ensemble quickly settles into a moderate tempo 4/4 groove with a jaunty melody. While two percussionists share the responsibility of executing the melodies and counter melodies on the xylophone and glockenspiel, the rest of the ensemble plays on a wide variety of auxiliary percussion instruments, as well as cymbals, concert toms, timpani, and a concert bass drum.

In addition to being a fun piece to play and program on a concert, it is also a great way to introduce young students to multiple-percussion score reading and basic extended playing techniques and notation. Some of these techniques include open and closed hi-hat, dampening or muting of instruments, striking various playing areas on a single instrument, and utilizing striking implements in a variety of ways. There are no tuning changes for the four timpani, but the part requires staccato and legato strokes, dampening, and playing on the bowls with the back of the mallets.

Printable parts and an audio recording are available on a CD-ROM that accompanies the score.

—Julie Licata
Percussive Notes
Vol. 56, No. 3, July 2018



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